Design, Nature, pattern, printmaking, Science and Art, Textile Design, Uncategorized

Eugène Séguy’s Prints and discovering the Biodiversity Heritage Library.

This week, my eyes have been drawn to the colourful and distinctive patterns of Eugène Séguy. I have not been able to find much information written on the internet about Séguy, a French Entomologist and Artist (1890 – 1 June 1985). He was a highly successful designer, whose enticing patterns represent the beauty and natural patterns observed in insects. I am drawn to the bright colours adopted and the use of repetition, Seguy’s design showcase the diverse and varied patterns created by nature and visible in the detail and intricacy of insects. The below images are available to view as part of the NCSU Library’s Rare and Unique Digital Collections and can be viewed here.

Papillons. Plate 3. E. A. Séguy's Papillons (QL466 .S448 1920), Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries
Papillons. Plate 3. Image Attribution:E. A. Séguy’s Papillons (QL466 .S448 1920), Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries
Papillons. Plate 10. E.A. Seguy.E. A. Séguy's Papillons (QL466 .S448 1920), Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries
Papillons. Plate 10. Image Attribution:E. A. Séguy’s Papillons (QL466 .S448 1920), Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries

 

Papillons. Plate 2. E. A. Séguy's Papillons (QL466 .S448 1920), Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries
Papillons. Plate 2. Image Attribution:E. A. Séguy’s Papillons (QL466 .S448 1920), Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries
E. A. Séguy's Papillons (QL466 .S448 1920), Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries 2
Papillons (Patterns). Image Attribution:E. A. Séguy’s Papillons (QL466 .S448 1920), Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries
E. A. Séguy's Papillons (QL466 .S448 1920), Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries
Papillons. Image Attribution:E. A. Séguy’s Papillons (QL466 .S448 1920), Special Collections Research Center at NCSU Libraries

 

The natural world, provides an endless resource of inspiration, in the diverse and varied way in which nature creates pattern. This fascinating variety, can be observed in the subtle differences observed in the many variates of species of butterflies that are beautifully illustrated in the below images. The illustrations are part of a book, published in 1775, which can be accessed online here,  thanks to the  incredible online resource that is, the Biodiversity Heritage Library.

The Library works to inspire discovery through free access to biodiversity knowledge. The site, improves research methodology by collaboratively making biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

I have only just discovered the resource myself and I am overwhelmed by the wealth of imagery and information which has been made available to view online. It opens up a fascinating window into many different aspects of the natural world and I definitely recommend this hugely valuable resource.

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A Amsteldam :Chez Barthelmy Wild,1779-1782 [i.e. 1775-1782]

deuitlandschekap11779cram_0289
A Amsteldam :Chez Barthelmy Wild,1779-1782 [i.e. 1775-1782]
deuitlandschekap11779cram_0088
A Amsteldam :Chez Barthelmy Wild,1779-1782 [i.e. 1775-1782]
deuitlandschekap11779cram_0075
A Amsteldam :Chez Barthelmy Wild,1779-1782 [i.e. 1775-1782]

art, Craft, Design, printmaking, Uncategorized

Making repeat patterns from an abstract etching

Scan 44 copyThe image above is an experimental drypoint etching I made a few years back. The inspiration for the drawing came from looking at preserved  herbarium specimens of the cotton plant. At the time, I wanted to find out more about cotton, a plant that we use everyday in such a wide variety of ways. I started looking at some of the many variations of the plant, displayed systematically on sheets of paper at the Herbarium of Liverpool Museum. I was inspired by  composition of the various parts of the plant, dried and placed on sheets of parchment.

To make the print, I etched a loose line drawing into a sheet of aluminium, the drawing method I used helped me lose control, creating a more obscure image. I hope that the image obtains an abstract quality, that’s subject matter is left to the imagination. In a sense, it is my attempt at interpreting the beauty of a highly complex and important material.

The following images were generated through randomly cropping parts of the above print on the computer and flipping and repeating to achieve something that looks a bit like a pattern.

cotton-4cotton-newUntitled-1

 

art, Craft, Design, Mid-Century-Modern textiles, printmaking, Textile Design, Uncategorized

Developing Patterns from Paper Collages

Following my previous post, ‘The Joy of Paper’, here are some patterns developed from the paper collages. After cropping the collages into small squares of colour combinations and compositions that I found interesting, I experimented with flipping the images to make repeat patterns in Adobe Illustrator. Here are the results.

 

Screen Shot 2018-01-22 at 17.28.09Screen Shot 2018-01-22 at 17.28.35Screen Shot 2018-01-22 at 17.28.18Screen Shot 2018-01-22 at 17.27.45

art, Craft, Design, printmaking, Textile Design, Uncategorized

The Joy of Paper

For the past few days, I’ve been enjoying experimenting with shapes and colour. Following on from my last blog inspired by Matisse’s cut outs, I’ve been exploring painting blocks of colour with goache onto sheets of newsprint paper. Using a felt pen, I played about with taking a line for a walk, making loose, unplanned shapes which I then cut up and put aside.

I then selected coloured shapes at random and firmly glued them to a blank piece of paper, the result was a very busy, cluttered collage with many overlapping shapes.

My plan was to then simply fold the A4 paper into quarters and then eighths, to create compositions. By rotating and cropping, I am now able to decide which compositions (if any) I would like to develop further.

 

The below images, show how patterns can begin to emerge through reflecting and rotating in Adobe Illustrator.

Screen Shot 2018-01-22 at 15.15.12

 

Design, Mid-Century-Modern textiles, printmaking, Textile Design, Uncategorized

Playing with Pattern in Adobe Illustrator

This evening I have been experimenting with generating quick spontaneous patterns using Adobe Illustrator.

The idea was to play with manipulating an image by cropping, reflecting and distorting.

I began with a very crude, mindless doodle (a squiggly line). I then took screenshots and used the image trace function in Illustrator. I began experimenting by removing parts before flipping the image both horizontally and vertically and arranging them in an order I felt looked interesting.

The computer really does do all of the work, but the simple process shows how through continuous exploration (or play!), unexpected results can occur that can become starting points for more developed work.Screen Shot 2018-01-11 at 20.28.10